Category Archives: Music Movies

Why I Admire Performers Like Mariah Carey

Mariah Carey

Mariah Carey

To be honest, I have never given Mariah Carey much thought. As an aging rocker raised on Elton John, Paul McCartney and U2, I have certainly experienced my share of glamorous musicians and diva antics, but I have never had much time for warbling femme-fatales, and so she, along with Celine Dion and Beyoncé have always been kept in a soundproof box in the back of my mind. To be fair, I admire any entertainer who can stand up in front of a crowd and wow them, regardless of the type of music they perform, so I never went so far as to say mean things about them. Its just that the specific tone of their singing never appealed to me. OK, maybe Cher once in a while, but I have always preferred female performers with a little more of a gruff edge, like Melissa Etheridge and Susan Tedeschi, and a little less time spent in the makeup chair. This (photo upper-right) is how I have always understood Mariah Carey to look. I figured this was probably actually her passport photo, given how glamorous she is.

So it amazed me when I saw her in one of the best movies I have ever seen, Precious, by Lee Daniels. This is a tough movie to watch. It is gritty, brutal and extremely memorable. The performance by Gabourey Sidibe was stellar, but in my opinion the show was completely stolen by Mo’Nique, who is better known as a comedienne.

Mo’Nique played a real SOB of a mom. A TV-addicted welfare case who treated her daughter worse than dirt. And it is only (SPOILER ALERT) during her tour-de-fource scene at the end of the film do you truly find out why. Her character was not a pretty character, but Mo’Nique played it well.

Mariah Carey was in this movie too. She played the social worker who sought to understand and fix the problems in Precious’s life. And she looked like this.

Also Mariah Carey

Also Mariah Carey

No makeup. No big hair. No radiant skin. She looked like every other 9-to-5 schmoe out there who has a job to do, but who doesn’t really like it very much.

I find it extremely admirable when beautiful celebrities shed their skin and reveal to the world that beneath it all, they are still one of us. They weren’t born looking like Halle Berry (OK, maybe Halle Berry was). They were lucky enough to make it big in a vicious industry where most fall away, and their product is big, wonderful excessive enormousness.

So I salute both Mariah Carey and Mo’Nique for taking what some might consider a big risk in appearing on the big screen in all their plain normality. To me this only makes them more beautiful.

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Pink Floyd’s The Wall

Pink Floyd - The Wall - inside album art

Pink Floyd – The Wall – inside album art

On this day (March 22) in 1980, Pink Floyd’s single “Another Brick In the Wall Part 2” was released, and it stayed at number 1 on the US singles charts for 4 weeks. The Wall remains one of my favorite albums of all time, and the movie, directed by Alan Parker and illustrated by Gerald Scarfe, remains one of my top three favourite movies ever.

To me this film seemed to capture both the craziness of big-time rock and roll as well as the alienation and confusion I was experiencing as a typical teenager. It was an album and a movie I could get lost in: the music, tinged with desperation and anger, and the movie, portraying the visual confusion of a drug-addled rock star played by a young Bob Geldof, that not merely blurred the borders between reality and hallucination, but positively chewed them up.

Other movies have done a good job at portraying the surreal life of a travelling superstar musician, or even wannabe superstars such as in Almost Famous, and even This is Spinal Tap, but The Wall, with its limos, roadies, groupies and drugs seemed to capture it all with all of the glitzy overkill of the early days of MTV and the music videos that were to follow.

As a piece of art. I find The Wall to be amazing. Some might find it dated now, of course, but it reminds me in many ways of The Sting, directed by George Roy Hill, which is another of my three top favourite movies of all time. The Sting used Scott Joplin’s ragtime genius to capture the feeling of Depression-era America, and used a Norman Rockwell-style cinematographyto frame it all. Parker basically used the angry sharp-edged animations of Gerald Scarfe to the same effect.

The wall also represented an excellent example of the concept album: something you were expected to listen to from beginning to end – two full LP’s – a style of entertainment that is less welcome in the age of downloadable singles.

I am not sure if there is a “Making of The Wall”documentary out there, but I would love to get my paws on it if there is.

 

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